Law student aids refugees

first_imgAs Kenan Rahmani looked up at the plane that had just dropped a TNT barrel and killed 18 innocent people near him, he said his shock and fear differed sharply from the unaffected attitudes of the Syrians that surrounded him. For them, destruction is a normal, everyday occurrence, he said. Rahmani, a law student at Notre Dame, was one of nine individuals sponsored by the Syrian American Council (SAC) to journey to the country over Christmas break to provide aid to the refugees. The nation has been engaged in a rebellion against the oppressive Assad regime since April 2011. Rahmani, who is of Syrian descent, said he is determined to do something to help the country and the people within its refugee camps. “Our task was to assess the humanitarian situation in order to improve it,” Rahmani said. “The camps are filled with people dying, kids freezing. In some camps, the only food provided is one boiled potato per tent, to be shared with multiple people.” The Free Syrian Army is composed of rebels fighting against the oppessive police state, Rahmani said. He said the regime has used every weapon imaginable to punish its people. Currently, the rebel forces have captured roughly 60 percent of land area in Syria. “The conflict has already killed 60,000 people, and those are just the documented deaths,” Rahmani said. “There are close to 140,000 people missing, most of whom are dead. No matter where you go, you cannot find a single household that is whole.” The refugee camps are filled with 700,000 Syrian citizens displaced by the war, Rahmani said. He and his companions delivered $15,000 in aid to the camps. This money funded the construction of bathrooms, paving roads and fuel generators. They also donated $4,000 of flour to a suburb of Aleppo, a major city in Syria, which was enough money to bake bread for everyone in the town. Rahmani emphasized, however, that the struggle to overcome the devastation will not end with the end of the conflict. “Even when the war ends, a whole generation has been psychologically destroyed,” Rahmani said. “Our young people have seen nothing but bloodshed. Our girls have been raped, and our men and women have been killed.” Rahmani said echoes of the conflict will continue to affect Syrian society. “For 30 years, we will be fighting against the economic repercussions of this regime as well.” As Rahmani interacted with the refugees, he said the feeling of hostility was palpable. “People did not want me there, which was tragic,” he said. “Syrians have felt that the world has abandoned them. “The whole ordeal is now normal to them, and that is the ultimate sign of failure for the United States.” Contact Katie McCarty at kmccart16@nd.edulast_img read more

Speaker explores potential of cochlear implants

first_imgBecki Jeren | The Observer Jason P. Wiegand, assistant professor at University of South Carolina speaks on the future of cochlear implants.The communicative sciences and disorders department at Saint Mary’s hosted a lecture on cochlear implants by board certified audiologist, Jason P. Wigand. Wigand is an assistant professor and clinical director of the cochlear implant program at the University of South Carolina.Wigand himself has a bilateral cochlear implant, an implant on each ear. His lecture, “From Candidacy to Implantation through Rehabilitation,” focused on his own personal experience with cochlear implants and the process of getting an implant.Wigand said he was an ROTC student in college but failed a hearing test and was medically discharged. He said his doctors believe he had an inner ear attack in 1993.“In the four to six years before I failed my hearing test my hearing was getting worse bit by bit,” Wigand said. Over the course of about four years his hearing got progressively worse, he said.Wigand said he received his first implant at Yale University in 2005 after an audiologist at an ear, nose and throat (ENT) group in Connecticut suggested cochlear implants.“I ended up looking for another pair of the best hearing aids because my hearing was going quickly. So I get the hearing aids … and end up going for a new pair and the audiologist said, ‘Has anyone talked to you about cochlear implants?,’ I had heard about them, by this time it was 2004, but didn’t know a lot.”Wigand received his undergraduate degree in management and worked for FedEx for 15 years when he found himself tired of the job. He said he learned about the field of audiology when he began a new career at Ohio State University.“I had a great career … you just find yourself not wanting the next step. So I get an opportunity to go to Ohio as a regional manager. Basically I find myself in the same position … 78 hour weeks, I didn’t like it … So I started doing some testing as a subject at Ohio State with a researcher and after a couple months he was looking for a research assistant and I thought, ‘I want to do this, I really like this, I want to know more,’” Wigand said.He said he then talked to professors at Ohio State and went back to school to become an audiologist.Wigand said a cochlear implant is surgically placed on the round window of the inner ear, which is behind the eye. The implant bypasses the inner ear and goes directly to the nerve that sends the signal to the brain.Wigand said that for an adult to qualify for a cochlear implant, the adult has to meet requirements medically, with speech intelligibility and have a moderate to severe or profound sensorineural hearing loss.“In adults, the criterion has changed over the past 10 years, initially you had to be severe to profound hearing loss,” he said. “The conversation [of getting a cochlear implant] starts when they are not doing well with their hearing aids.”Wigand said hearing loss is a unique problem for each patient.“Just because I’m hearing impaired does not mean I can relate to every patient … With hearing loss, it is completely individual,” he said.More information about cochlear implants can be found on www.asha.orgTags: Cochlear Implants, communicative sciences and disorders, Jason P. Wiegand, saint mary’slast_img read more

Southeast Asian nations set region-wide renewable energy goal of 23 percent by 2025

first_imgSoutheast Asian nations set region-wide renewable energy goal of 23 percent by 2025 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The ASEAN Post:[The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN)] has set an ambitious target of securing 23 percent of its primary energy from renewable sources by 2025 with energy demand in the region is expected to grow by 50 percent. According to the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA), this objective entails a “two-and-a-half-fold increase in the modern renewable energy share compared to 2014.”With the rapidly declining cost of renewable energy generation via such methods as wind and solar photovoltaic (PV), the Southeast Asian region has been presented with a golden opportunity to meet its immense electricity demand in a cost-effective and sustainable manner.A Southeast Asia Energy Outlook report states that through this, local manufacturing industries will also be able to grow. For example, Malaysia is already the world’s third-largest producer of photovoltaic cells, while investment in Thailand’s solar manufacturing industry is increasing PV output for global markets. By deploying more renewable energy in the region, the economies of these ASEAN member states can be further strengthened.Rising energy needs and changing supply-demand dynamics are creating new and tough challenges for Southeast Asia’s policymakers. Despite existing opportunities created by appropriate policies, some challenges require a region-wide approach.“The accelerated adoption of renewable energy offers broad environmental, economic and social benefits, including creating jobs, reducing air pollution and tackling climate change,” said Adnan Z Amin, IRENA’s Director-General Emeritus. “Policymakers and other development actors should prioritise investment in clean, reliable and affordable energy as a pillar of development across the region,” he added.More: Renewable energy challenges in Southeast Asialast_img read more

LV PREPLAN Santo Domingo 2015 on Target for CONJEFAMER in Mexico

first_imgSICOFAA conferences are instrumental in laying the groundwork for developing frameworks which help Air Forces from the Americas provide humanitarian assistance to their civilian populations. For example, since January 1, the Colombian Air Force (CAF) has played an important role in fighting forest fires throughout the country. By February, fires had occurred in almost 80 percent of Colombia and destroyed thousands of hectares, mostly virgin vegetation and natural forests. Air Forces are continually training to help the civilian population. For example, in November, the Dominican Air Force participated in an exercise in which it mobilized a rapid response to the simulated spread of the deadly Ebola virus (which in reality has not appeared in the country). In the drill, an infected individual entered the country at the Las Americas International Airport near Santa Domingo. The Air Force responded quickly to protect the civilian population and provide appropriate medical care to the patient, all in coordination with two civilian agencies — the Specialized Airport and Civil Aviation Security Corps (CESAC) and the Civil Defense, Immigration and Metropolitan Transportation Authority (AMET). Developing an agenda In January, the Air Force sent helicopters from the Fifth Air Combat Command to fight two major conflagrations in the department of Boyacá. The Army, National Police, Civil Defense, and other agencies also cooperated in battling the Boyacá fires, using the National Disaster Prevention and Response System. Major General Benjamín Romero Fuentes, an aviator and a graduate of the Mexican Air Force Academy, chaired the LV PREPLAN 2015 meeting. The opening ceremony was held in the Hall of the Hotel Santo Domingo Barceló Bávaro, Punta Cana, where Major General Elvis Marcelino Féliz Pérez, a pilot and Chief of Staff of the Dominican Republic Air Force and his staff, welcomed international and local delegates. “It’s a great privilege for us to extend the warmest greetings of welcome to the distinguished delegates of the sister SICOFAA Air Force members, gathered at the opening of this LV PREPLAN meeting,” Maj. Gen. Féliz Pérez said. Representatives from the Air Forces of 17 countries of the Americas — from Canada in the north to Chile and Argentina in the south — met under LV PREPLAN Santo Domingo 2015 in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic from May 18-22 to discuss the agenda for the annual Conference of the American Air Chiefs (CONJEFAMER), which will take place in Mexico from June 22-27. The purpose of the meeting was to finalize the agendas, activities and tasks to be developed in the framework of LIV CONJEFAMER 2015, taking into account the guidelines established in the American Air Forces Cooperation System Manual Procedures. “The various recommendations that resulted from the SICOFAA Permanent Secretariat activities were analyzed and evaluated during the LV PREPLAN meeting in order to reach conclusions, which in turn defined the recommendations and agenda for CONJEFAMER,” Maj. Gen. Féliz Pérez said. “These cooperation agreements are positive because they allow the possibility of updating the knowledge required by the Air Forces in defending the sovereignty of their nations,” said Daniel Pou, an analyst and research associate at the Latin American Faculty of Social Sciences (FLACSO) in the Dominican Republic. Officials from the Air Forces of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, El Salvador, United States, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Uruguay and Dominican Republic participated in the meeting. Every year, PREPLAN precedes CONJEFAMER, the meeting of Air Force chiefs who are members of the System of Cooperation Among the American Air Forces, or SICOFAA. “Today all countries are on the look-out for any disaster. Among the topics covered [during LV PREPLAN 2015] was that of search and rescue, and disaster relief assistance,” Maj. Gen. Féliz Pérez said. Gatherings such as CONJEFAMER and SICOFAA not only provide good training opportunities, they also promote cooperation and unity among the Air Forces of the Americas. Participants at the SICOFAA meeting discussed a wide array of topics, such as “Air operations airspace control, search and rescue, disaster assistance, prevention of air accidents, among others.” SICOFAA is an apolitical voluntary international organization comprised of officials from the Air Forces of North and South America. It began in 1961 as a forum for senior leaders from Air Forces in the Western Hemisphere to discuss Military issues and aviation topics; it’s based out of Davis-Monthan Air Force Base in Arizona in the United States, and holds a yearly meeting. The last time the Dominican Republic hosted the PREPLAN meeting was in 2011. Air forces are united and allied By Dialogo June 18, 2015last_img read more

March 15, 2004 Disciplinary Actions

first_imgMarch 15, 2004 Disciplinary Actions March 15, 2004 Disciplinary Actions Disciplinary Actionscenter_img The Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders suspended eight attorneys, disbarred four, accepted the resignation of three, reprimanded two, and placed one attorney on probation.The following lawyers are disciplined: Robert Michael Arcaini, P.O. Box 5435, Hialeah, suspended from practicing law in Florida for two years, effective retroactive to April 12, 2001 following a November 6, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice : 1994) Arcaini engaged in conduct that is prejudicial to the administration of justice and declined or terminated representation. (Case no. SC03-1814) Gilbert Carrillo, 2651 S.W. 109th Ave., Davie, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 30 days, effective 30 days following a November 6, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1976) Among several Bar violations, Carrillo committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer in other respects; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit or misrepresentation; and engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice. (Case no. SC03-485) Robert Ian Claire, 1900 N.W. Corporate Blvd., Ste. 300W, Boca Raton, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following a December 11, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1984) Among several Bar violations, Claire failed to comply with The Florida Bar Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer; and engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation. (Case no. SC03-921) James Gaultney Etheredge, 226 Troy St. N.E., Ft. Walton Beach, resigned in lieu of disciplinary proceedings without leave to seek readmission, effective 30 days following a November 6, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1972) At the time of Etheredge’s resignation, he was under investigation for several pending cases, including allegedly failing to file monthly psychiatric reports and failing to pay monthly monitoring fees; failing to advise clients of the dismissal of suits or his option of rehearing or appeal; and engaging in false, misleading, and deceptive advertising. (Case no. SC03-970) Jeffrey Martin Herman, 17701 Biscayne Blvd., Ste. 200, Aventura, resigned in lieu of disciplinary proceedings with leave to seek readmission after five years, effective 30 days following a November 20, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1985) At the time of Herman’s resignation, he was under investigation for several pending cases concerning allegations of neglect; misuse of funds and trust accounting violations; and conduct prejudicial to the administration of justice. (Case no. SC03-1674) Robert Carroll Hesson, 2247 Herrington Manor Road, Oakland, Md., suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following a November 6, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1981) Among several Bar violations, Hesson failed to pay annual Bar membership fees and failed to comply with continuing legal education requirements; engaged in practicing law while a delinquent member; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel. (Case no. SC03-687) Kristopher A. Hollands, 1613 Chelsea Road, Ste. 318, San Marino, Ca., disbarred from practicing law in Florida,effective immediately following a November 20, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1993) On April 22, 2002, Hollands was convicted of mail fraud in California, a felony. Hollands participated in criminal misconduct; committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and engaged in conduct prejudicial to the administration of justice. (Case no. SC02-2708) Cheryl Johnson Howard, P.O. Box 1231, Princeton, N.J., disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following a November 20, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1988) Howard failed to respond, in writing, to official inquiries by Bar counsel. (Case no. SC03-85) Carolyn Karettis, 3107 Stirling Road, Ft. Lauderdale, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a November 26, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1987) Karettis engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and failed to promptly notify the client or third person upon receiving trust account funds. (Case no. SC03-1946) Kathleen Ann Kearney, 1317 Winewood Blvd., Tallahassee, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following a December 11, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1981) Kearney failed to provide the Bar with a change of address and failed to respond, in writing, to any official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency when conducting an investigation. (Case no. SC03-923) Jay M. Kolsky, 1320 N.W. 14th St., Miami, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a November 6, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1973) In representing a client, Kolsky knowingly made a false statement of material fact or law to a third person. (Case no. SC03-1775) Edward Paul Kreiling, 2668 Edgewater Drive, Weston, permanently disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following a December 11, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1975) Among several Bar violations, Kreiling violated The Florida Bar Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer; and engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation. (Case no. SC03-1225) Jorge Enrique Luna, Jr., P.O. Box 3663, Orlando, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following a December 11, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1996) Among several Bar violations, Luna failed to provide a client with competent representation; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and neglected to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter. (Case no. SC02-2303) Joseph Pardo, 416 W. San Marco Drive, Miami Beach, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 90 days, effective 30 days following a December 11, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1950) Pardo failed to adequately communicate with a person represented by counsel and failed to provide competent representation to a client. (Case no. SC03-792) Donald Vaughn Phillips, 301 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 10 days, effective 30 days following a November 20, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1984) Phillips failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to keep a client informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency. (Case no. SC03-1184) Rose J. Spano, P.O. Box 50136, Lighthouse Point, placed on probation for one year, effective immediately following a December 4, 2003 court order. In addition, Spano must enter into an agreement with Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc. ( Admitted to practice: 1985) Spano committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on her fitness as a lawyer. (Case nos. SC00-222 and SC01-275) Robert Eugene Tamm, 408 N. Wild Olive Ave., Daytona Beach, resigned in lieu of disciplinary proceedings without leave to seek readmission, following a November 13, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1976) At the time of Tamm’s resignation, he was under investigation concerning allegations that he misappropriated estate funds while in the capacity of personal representative and counsel of record. (Case no. SC03-1354) James Vance Walker, P.O Box 676, Ponte Vedra Beach, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 10 days, effective November 21, 2003 following a December 8, 2003 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1976) Walker failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and for failing to promptly comply with the reasonable request for information; and failed to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation. (Case no. SC03-38) Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline.last_img read more

Florida Bar’s investments have a strong third quarter

first_img Florida Bar’s investments have a strong third quarter The Florida Bar has had excellent returns on its investments in the third quarter of the year.Investment Committee Chair Ian Comisky reported to the Bar Board of Governors recently that from the end of June through August 16, the Bar’s investments rose by 2.6 percent, or from $17.198 million to $17.66 million.He reminded the board that the funds are invested in a careful mix, ranging from bond funds to small, medium, large, and international stock funds, with the amount invested in each following a specific formula.“The discipline is trying to ensure we keep sufficient diversification, which protects the investment portfolio as a whole,” Comisky said.Comisky also said the Bar’s Investment Committee is renewing the organization’s contract with Morgan Stanley, which advises on and oversees the investment program. October 1, 2005 Regular News Florida Bar’s investments have a strong third quarterlast_img read more

Baby Boomers need to “bank on” Millennials to change the way we manage money

first_imgMillennials are changing the face of the money world. Gone are the days of traditional brick-and-mortar banking. Here are the days of technology.According to the United States Census Bureau, the U.S. Millennial population is over 75 million, making them the largest demographic group. Their outlook, influence, and spending habits will “have profound implications for the U.S. economy overall,” as stated on Newsweek.com. “Automation and speed are critical to a tech-savvy generation, and millennials’ demands are bumping up against the limitations of traditional financial frameworks, which can seem lethargic and unresponsive. New needs are spurring new entrants into the marketplace, changing the way (they) purchase, finance and invest.” This is a wake-up call for banks.“Few industries will face a greater struggle targeting these new customers than banks, who seem wholly unprepared with what to do with us. Indeed, if ever there was a dark evil in the world that millennials as a whole would probably like to see completely destroyed like San Francisco in San Andreas, is the banking industry,” says TechCrunch.Banks reflect the desire of the consumer, but are not quick to respond to the changing market. They have huge investments in brick-and-mortar establishments. Baby Boomers wanted to buy homes, so they got mortgages and home equity loans from banks. Boomers were living longer and needed to save for retirement, so they got investment and retirement products from banks and financial institutions. Boomers wanted to go visit their local banks and financial advisors and talk to them and to buy products and sort out problems – face-to-face. continue reading » 23SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Rigid restrictions on all lenders would diminish CU offerings

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » While credit unions support efforts to rein in high-cost loan products that aren’t consumer-friendly, it warned against overly prescriptive rules that could hamper availability of safe and affordable credit union products. CUNA wrote to a House subcommittee this week for its hearing on ways certain bad actors evade consumer protection laws.“We acknowledge the presence of some harmful products in the small dollar market and support sensible efforts to rein in these high-cost loans. However, we caution Congress and federal regulators against haphazardly establishing rigid restrictions on all lenders that would likely result in the diminished availability of fair and reasonable credit options from local credit unions.CUNA’s letter notes that credit unions, due to their member-owned structure, are a pro-consumer alternative to high cost loans. It also highlights that credit unions are effectively regulated by both state and federal laws, including interest rate caps that allow credit unions to offer short-term loans that are generally 400% lower APR than those made by payday lenders.last_img read more

PREMIUMMedia’s role vital in fight against ‘infodemics’ in time of coronavirus: Experts

first_imgAs the world battles the global outbreak of the COVID-19 coronavirus, which has now reached some 80 countries with the number of infections inching ever closer to 100,000, people now need to look out for another threat, “infodemics”.Melinda Frost, the World Health Organization’s (WHO) risk communication adviser, said Wednesday that the organization had taken measures to address infodemics — an excess of information, both factual and false, including disinformation and rumors — since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak.“The way we’re doing that is to cut through the noise by managing other sources of information and amplifiers [outside mainstream media]. We are working with different sectors: member states, health ministries, tourism sectors, and so on,” Frost said during a live telecast of a webinar held by the WHO and the Intern… Forgot Password ? Linkedin Log in with your social account Facebook media information WHO coronavirus Wuhan-coronavirus COVID-19 health outbreak LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Topics : Googlelast_img read more

US virus cases smash daily record as global infections soar

first_imgThe grim milestone came as the European Union left the United States, Brazil and Russia off its final list of nations safe enough to allow residents to enter its borders.With more than 52,000 new COVID-19 cases in the United States alone in the past 24 hours, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally, several US states imposed 14-day quarantines on visitors in the buildup to the long weekend’s July 4 celebrations.California suspended indoor dining at restaurants in Los Angeles and several counties, while New York scrapped plans to allow restaurants to seat customers inside from next week. President Donald Trump reiterated his belief that the contagion will “at some point… sort of just disappear, I hope.” Americas spike In the United States, spikes across southern and western states are driving a surge in national infections.Texas, which again smashed its daily COVID-19 record with over 8,000 new cases, joined Florida and California in closing some beaches for the upcoming holiday weekend.Apple announced it would close another 30 US stores on Thursday, half of them in California.A further 700 deaths nationwide took the US past 128,000 deaths in total.The Pan American Health Organization warned that the death toll in Latin America and the Caribbean could quadruple to more than 400,000 by October without stricter public health measures.The US government announced this week it had bought 92 percent of all remdesivir production — the first drug to be shown to be relatively effective in treating COVID-19.Britain and Germany, however, said Wednesday they had sufficient stocks of the drug. But the US leader who has yet to be seen in public wearing a face mask during the pandemic added he would have “no problem” doing so.  Clusters spur new lockdownsRussia did not make the EU’s list of approved countries so its citizens will be absent from the bloc’s tourist hot-spots.The country, however, enjoyed a public holiday Wednesday as it voted in a referendum to approve constitutional changes allowing President Vladimir Putin to stay in power for another 16 years.Putin was forced to postpone the vote in April as his government tackled an outbreak that has infected almost 650,000 people — the third-highest in the world.In other countries, clusters are still causing problems. Parts of the Australian city of Melbourne suffered sharp rises in infections, spurring new stay-at-home measures.The Palestinian Authority announced a five-day lockdown across the West Bank after a surge in confirmed cases.And textile factories in the central British city of Leicester were suggested as the reason for a spike in infections that has prompted the reimposition of local restrictions. Topics : EU travel ban eased The rollbacks came as the European Union reopened its borders to visitors from 15 countries.The bloc hopes relaxing restrictions on countries from Algeria to Uruguay will breathe life into its tourism sector, choked by a ban on non-essential travel since mid-March.Travelers from China, where the virus first emerged late last year, will be allowed to enter the EU only if Beijing reciprocates.And Brazil — which has suffered the most deaths globally for the last week, and is the second-worst affected country overall — was excluded entirely.It topped 60,000 total fatalities Wednesday, after suffering 1,000 deaths in just 24 hours.However, with over 10 million known infections worldwide and more than 500,000 deaths, the pandemic is “not even close to being over”, the WHO warned.Data provided by the UN health agency for the seven days from June 25-July 1 showed the highest number of new daily cases ever recorded came on June 28, when over 189,500 new cases were registered worldwide. ‘Corona baby’ In Britain, some 1,500 acts from Ed Sheeran and Coldplay to Paul McCartney and The Rolling Stones urged the county’s government to save the live music industry, which has been collapsing because of the coronavirus.But while lockdown measures have been a disaster for many, some have welcomed the chance to spend more quality time with hard-working partners. New daily coronavirus cases in the United States soared past 50,000 for the first time Wednesday, as the World Health Organization delivered a grave warning that the global pandemic is accelerating.Restaurants, bars and beaches in the world’s worst-hit nation closed from California to Florida, as states reeling from yet another surge in the deadly virus braced for Independence Day festivities.Global infections have hit their highest level in the past week, WHO data showed, with chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus saying new cases topped “160,000 on every single day.” ‘Dutch brothels reopen’ According to the United Nations, the coronavirus crisis could cost global tourism and related sectors from $1.2 to $3.3 trillion in lost revenue.Greece, which has suffered fewer than 200 virus deaths, has seen its economy hit hard by lockdowns and travel restrictions — all but ending its lucrative tourism season before it began.Romanian Cojan Dragos was “the first tourist” in one Corfu hotel after driving there with his wife and daughter.”We have the whole hotel just for us,” he told AFP. Separately, Spain and Portugal held a ceremony as they reopened their land border.The Netherlands also confirmed the reopening Wednesday of another tourist draw — its brothels and red-light districts.”I’m totally booked,” said sex worker Foxxy, adding that she had held a “little party” when she heard restrictions would be lifted.last_img read more