Andrew Sheridan extends his contract with Sale Sharks

first_img“This is a massive statement of intent by the club and Andrew. Steve Diamond signed Sherri back in 2003 and once Andrew knew about Steve’s return, he was delighted to put pen to paper. Inevitably there was a lot of interest in his signature and I do know that he has turned down some big offers from a number of other clubs. He is one of the best prop forwards in the world and we are thrilled he has made this commitment to stay with us.” LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Sale Sharks, England and British Lions International Andrew Sheridan has ended speculation about his future by extending his existing contract to stay at Sale Sharks for a further season.Andrew joined Sale Sharks from Bristol Shoguns in 2003 and has played 100 games for the club. He made the first of his 36 England appearances v Canada in 2004. He played in the 2007 Rugby World Cup Final and also toured with the British Lions in 2005 and 2009. He is renowned for his destructive scrummaging displays and powerful ball carrying in the loose.CEO Mick Hogan said, Steve Diamond speaking from New Zealand said, “ I am very pleased Andrew has re-signed for the club. I remember watching him develop as a player and knew he was going to be one of the best as his career progressed. I have followed his progress with interest and am looking to build a team around Sherri and Mark Cueto who has also been a loyal servant to the club down the years.” TAGS: Sale Sharks last_img read more

Wilson Whineray

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS His awkward packing technique caused front-row opponents problems. The most highly acclaimed tighthead of the era was the Springbok Piet du Toit, and their battles in South Africa in 1960 were titanic. Though the All Blacks narrowly lost the series, the New Zealander was the only loosehead of his time to neutralise the havoc for which du Toit was famed. Sir Wilson Whineray was that rugby rarity, a loosehead who had scrummaging maturity beyond his years.The New Zealander’s star shone brightly from the day he made his Test debut against Australia in 1957, aged 21, and it never dimmed in a career that spanned nine years. The last eight of these, moreover, were as skipper in 30 Internationals – a world record for Test captaincy that lasted nearly 20 years until beaten by the Frenchman Jean-Pierre Rives.In open play, Whineray showed a range of deft touches, the legacy of his earlier days in a variety of positions in and behind the scrum. He had soft hands, sold convincing dummies and was adept at the long-lost art of dribbling. Major teams: Canterbury, Waikato, Auckland Country: New ZealandTest span: 1957-65Test caps: 32 (32 starts)Test points: 6 (2T)center_img Whineray’s captaincy style was autocratic, but New Zealand lost only five Tests while he was at the helm. The veteran critic Terry McLean unhesitatingly named him ‘New Zealand’s greatest captain’, while Colin Meads, an exact contemporary, spoke for a talented generation of All Blacks when he said, “As a captain he inspired fierce loyalty.” High praise indeed from one who might easily have had his own designs on the leadership.Note, too, the day in 1964 when Whineray’s All Blacks skittled the Barbarians 36-3 in the traditional tour finale at Cardiff. As the skipper dummied and sidestepped to the posts to complete the try-scoring, an admiring full-house was roused to sing For He’s A Jolly Good Fellow. It was a fitting tribute to a great player and captain. TAGS: The Greatest Players last_img read more

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgWhere did he go? Tom Varndell is left trailing in Ken Pisi’s wake. (Photo: Getty Images)Red zoneDespite being sent off for knocking out Mariano Galarza with a leading arm, Alafoti Fa’osiliva is not among my Sinners as while what he did had severe consequences for the Gloucester lock, players drive into contact with a leading arm all the time and are not punished.However, Harlequins replacement Matthew Luamanu is on the list for his clumsy no-arms tackle on Josh Beaumont, which earned him a red card. His right shoulder connected with Beaumont’s head and put the Sale man out of the game and there was nothing about Luamanu’s challenge which resembled a legal tackle. Roko runs riot Bath scored eight tries as they put Newcastle Falcons to the sword with a 58-5 Aviva Premiership win and three of those tries belonged in one way or another to Semisa Rokoduguni.He scored two of them, after 35 and 40 minutes, but earlier in the game the wing created a penalty try when he sprinted from his own 22, chipped and chased up the right and forced Niki Goneva to slap the ball over the dead ball line to prevent a try being scored.Attwood at the double: Dave Attwood is pretty happy to have scored. (Photo: Getty Images)Kahn Fotuali’i had a magnificent game, setting up a try for Matt Banahan with a lovely chip and creating so much of Bath’s attacking play and Dave Attwood also grabbed two tries to help the west country side to their biggest league win in 15 years. Kicks cost WilliamsLiam Williams made a couple of bad mistakes during the Scarlets’ 20-9 loss in Edinburgh, costing his team a try on both occasions.First the Wales full-back just failed to gather a cross-field kick from Duncan Weir after sprinting to reach it, and Michael Allen slid onto the loose ball and touched down for a try, which put Edinburgh 13-6 up.Later in the first half Williams attempted a clearance kick from his own 22 but drilled the ball low and straight into an Edinburgh player, Magnus Bradbury scooped up the intercept and raced in for a try to give the home side a 20-6 lead at half-time.The Scarlets have lost their first two matches, making this their worst start to a Pro12 season, but they can be sure Williams will have better days.Tom Varndell cost his team a try in the Aviva Premiership when he missed a crucial tackle on Ken Pisi midway through the first half and let the Northampton man score. The Saints went on to beat Bristol 32-10. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Smiling assassin: Tommy Seymour had an extremely happy day at Scotstoun. (Photo: Inpho) Corking play from the Blues Tom James and Dan Fish took many of the plaudits after Cardiff Blues’ 24-23 win over Munster in Cork, but several of their team-mates played key roles in securing this famous victory.James scored two tries and Fish touched down what turned out to be the winning score, but that crucial 67th minute try was created by great play from replacement Matthew Morgan, who fielded a kick on his own ten metre line and offloaded superbly to Rey Lee-Lo. The centre broke then passed inside to replacement scrum-half Lloyd Williams, who provided the scoring pass for Fish.Another benchman, Steve Shingler, kicked the difficult conversion to put the Blues 24-20 up with 12 minutes to go and hooker Kristian Dacey made a crucial try-saving tackle on his opposite number as Munster repeatedly drove at the line in the dying minutes. Billy Vunipola was in storming form for Saracens. The SinnersMatt makes a mess of itLast week Gloucester let slip a seemingly unassailable lead against Leicester Tigers to turn a probably home win into a defeat.This week it was the Cherry and Whites who had to come from behind and they battled back from 20-9 down to 23-23 at Worcester, with two minutes to go, before a classic case of white-line fever from Matt Kvesic denied them a win.Gloucester were going through the phases inside the Warriors’ 22, looking for a winning try and playing against 14 men after Alafoti Fa’osiliva had been sent off. Kvesic received a pass and charged towards the line on the left, but instead of sending the ball on to either Henry Purdy or Jacob Rowan, who were lined up outside him just a few metres from the line and with only one defender nearby, the openside opted to take the ball up into a two-man tackle and so butchered a perfect try-scoring opportunity.Gloucester continued to attack before Rowan finally conceded a penalty at one of the many breakdowns and Worcester cleared their lines to close out a draw.center_img TAGS: Cardiff BluesHighlightLeinster Tries were still plentiful, as were away wins, as the second weekend of Aviva Premiership and Guinness Pro12 fixtures were completed. Who played a starring role and who fluffed their lines? Double doubles Rhys Webb played a crucial role in the Ospreys’ excellent 32-11 win in their Guinness Pro12 clash at Connacht, scoring two tries and managing the game very well.On the front foot: Rhys Webb kept the Ospreys on the attack. (Photo: Huw Evans Agency)Another Test star to grab a brace of tries this weekend was Sean Maitland, who helped Saracens win 34-13 at Exeter Chiefs in the Aviva Premiership. For the first, Maitland had to execute a brilliant diving catch to latch onto a low flipped pass as it headed for the left-hand touchline in the corner, while his second came after great handling from his team-mates. On his toes: Jimmy Gopperth (centre) kept Leicester on the back foot. (Photo: Getty Images)Jimmy be good Jimmy Gopperth had a terrific game for Wasps in their 34-22 win over Leicester Tigers. The No 12 created his team’s first try when he tackled Luke Hamilton and stripped him of the ball close to halfway, broke blind up the left and put in a sublime chip with the outside of his boot, which Christian Wade chased and picked up skilfully to score.Gopperth grabbed a try of his own at the death, when he was driven over by the forwards to seal the Aviva Premiership win for Wasps. Danny Cipriani might be wearing the No 10 jersey for Wasps, but it’s Gopperth who is stealing the playmaking limelight at the moment. The SaintsFour more from SeymourScoring two tries against champions Connacht last week seemed like a good start to the season for Tommy Seymour, but the Glasgow Warriors wing trumped that in style on Saturday when he ran in four tries against Leinster to help his team to a 33-25 Guinness Pro12 win.He raced in up the left wing for the first try, intercepted a pass from young Leinster fly-half Joey Carbery for the second, then picked up a loose pass from Noel Reid and scooted in under the posts for his hat-trick try just two minutes after his second, to put Glasgow 26-22 up.Seymour rounded off his contribution after the Warriors turned down a kickable penalty and opted to scrum instead, Henry Pyrgos broke from the back and Seymour cut a great line to take the ball at his shoulder and power through a tackle from Jamison Gibson-Park to score under the posts.Seymour only scored two tries in eight Pro12 appearances last season. He has six from his first two matches this term and with places on the British and Irish Lions tour to play for, must be delighted with his start. A cut aboveIf Leinster’s players have an unfamiliar look about them in the early part of this season, it is for the best of reasons. A  group of them took part in a “shave or dye” campaign at the dawn of the new campaign to raise funds for the family of departing defence coach Kurt McQuilkin, who returned to his native New Zealand for family reasons.Players headed for the barbers and either had their hair bleached or shaved, or a combination of both. Regular readers will know I like to take the mickey out of players for their more ridiculous haircuts, but on this occasion I have nothing but praise for the Leinster stars who have made themselves look (in some cases) more than a bit daft, for a good cause.Hair-raising: Dave Kearney is one of many Leinster players with a new look. (Photo: Inpho)last_img read more

Irish legend Peter Stringer retires at 40

first_imgAfter 21 seasons of pro rugby, scrum-half Peter Stringer has finally accepted that his playing days are over. Rugby World pays tribute to the 40-year-old Munsterman Concerned by hearing expressions of disapproval that their son was allowed to mix it with far bigger boys in a physical sport, Mr and Mrs Stringer decided to enlist Peter on a growth hormone programme. Peter’s distraught reaction convinced them to abandon the idea and he has gone on to genuine greatness – 230-plus Munster appearances and 98 Ireland caps do not happen by accident.Young star: In action for Pres during the 1993 Munster Schools Junior Cup final (Des Barry/Cork Examiner)His size makes him well placed to discuss the merits of a recent call, by a group of doctors and academics, to ban tackling in schools on the basis that some children will get hurt.“I wouldn’t change a thing from the rugby I’ve played. It would do a lot more damage if people only started tackling at 18. It would kill the game, ruin the professional game,” Stringer says unequivocally.“Being coached properly is the main thing; you need the right technique. You start by tackling on your knees and everyone is at the same level, with relatively similar sizes and heights. If you learn from a young age, it’s easier to pick it up and it’s engrained in you. You have a base level doing it regularly under correct supervision.”Rival Shark: Mike Phillips, signed from Racing, was another old hand at No 9 for Sale (Action Images)Stringer says that even today, when making a tackle for Sale, he sometimes hears the voice of one of his former mini coaches yelling, “Take him by the legggggs!”The Munsterman dismisses the suggestion that the legal height of a tackle should be lowered. In three and a half decades of rugby, he has suffered three concussions, none of them at school. “From my point of view, for a tall guy to tackle me below the sternum is very difficult. You see higher shots on smaller guys but I’ve no problem with that.”The bigger they are… Tackling Bath’s Matt Banahan, a former team-mate, at the AJ Bell Stadium (Getty)He has more sympathy for the idea of weight bandings for age-grade rugby, as occurs in New Zealand. There, youngsters of certain ethnic backgrounds tend to develop earlier and large playing numbers ensure that no one misses out.“In some ways weight-related rugby would have been an advantage for me,” he muses. “If I’d played against guys of the same size when younger I’d have had more confidence going into contact and the ability to develop offloading skills. Whereas I found when taking contact that I was fighting my way to the ground, rather than having the power to go through a tackle.“But if you’re a small player up against bigger ones from day one, you develop footwork to avoid bigger guys, and speed to get round them. Being small gave me a tenacity to survive that has stood me in good stead right through my career. If I’d been thrust into weight-related rugby, then a number of years later would I have been able to adapt to adult rugby?Sandwich filling: Stringer has Mal O’Kelly and Alan Quinlan beside him for the anthem at RWC 2003 (Inpho)“It’s an interesting one, there are pluses on both sides. Everyone is born with a certain amount of talent, with footwork and speed for example. If Jason Robinson, say, had played with same-size guys, would he have tried to run over them instead of step?“By the time you get to senior level you’ll have missed out on years of sidestepping and evasive skills, and so might not be able to implement them in a game against bigger guys.  You’ve got to face big guys at some stage. The earlier you do so, the better it is for your skill level.”Stringer points out too the perils of asking, say, a big 15-year-old to play with 17-year-olds of a similar size but at a completely different level of emotional and social maturity.“You’d be on dangerous ground there. At school especially, rugby is about the enjoyment factor. If you try to move people out of their natural age groups that could be taken away and you’d end up with a lot fewer people playing the game.”So speaks a voice of experience and reason, a player who hasn’t allowed either size or age to hinder his ambition. This weekend Sale need a victory at Newcastle to try to secure Champions Cup qualification – and, as he completes his 19th season as a pro player, Peter Stringer will be at the heart of the challenge as always. Force nine: Peter Stringer has proved an outstanding role model for young professionals (Pic: Inpho) Irish legend Peter Stringer retires at 40 Peter Stringer finally called time this week, bringing the curtain down on a remarkable career that yielded 98 Ireland caps and more than 350 pro club or provincial appearances combined for Munster, Saracens, Newcastle, Bath, Sale and Worcester. Along the way he won a Six Nations Grand Slam in 2009, three Triple Crowns and the 2006 Heineken Cup, but he will be remembered most for the outstanding professionalism that enabled him to play arguably the world’s toughest contact sport until the age of 40. Only Brad Thorn (Leicester, 2015) and Paul Turner (Saracens, 1999) have appeared in a Premiership match at an older age.“From the age of five all I ever dreamed of doing was playing rugby. I cannot describe how it feels to have lived that dream for nearly all my life,” said Stringer. “The journey has been an uncompromising obsession filled with memories I will cherish forever.“To the coaches who never saw my size as disadvantageous, thank you. To my team-mates who motivated and inspired me, thank you. To my parents and brothers, I could not have reached my goals without you. Here’s to the next chapter.”Rugby World interviewed Stringer a couple of years ago when he had just won a player award at Sale Sharks. Here’s how we paid tribute to the Munsterman on that occasion…Final days: Stringer in action last season for Worcester, the last of his five English clubs (Getty Images)There were warm tributes for Chris Cusiter this week after the Sale scrum-half called time on a career that included 70 Scotland caps and one for the Lions, off the bench in that curious 2005 draw with Argentina on home soil.At nearly 34, Cusiter has given professional rugby a very good lash. But in truth he’s had to play second fiddle in his final season to a man who will celebrate his 40th birthday next year.Peter Stringer lost out to Cusiter in Lions squad selection all those years ago but he has never stopped driving himself on, determined to be the best he can be for as long as can be.Jonny Wilkinson’s obsession with self-improvement is legendary but even he had the odd drink during his career; Stringer has never sipped alcohol or dragged on a cigarette, he exercises twice daily even when on holiday, and he thinks nothing of taking his own (mega-healthy) lunchbox to the airport when faced with an away match. Salmon and rocket anyone?His single-mindedness means that his fitness levels are never in question – scrum-half is an especially unforgiving position in that respect. And more than three years after being let go by Munster, he has just been voted the Supporters’ Player of the Year at Sale.“Peter Stringer has brought our back-line to life this season,” said director of rugby Steve Diamond when extending the player’s contract until next summer.Northern rock: Spinning a pass away for Sale against Saracens in February 2016 (Action Images)If his longevity is extraordinary, Stringer’s size is no less remarkable. At 5ft 7in and 11st 5lb (72kg) pretty much all of his career, he has, paradoxically, stood out from the crowd for most of a rugby journey that began with his home-city club Cork Constitution when he was six.His small stature has led to him being treated differently in countless ways, subtle or otherwise. At UCC, his university rugby coach asked his parents for permission to pick him. After he was punched by Alessandro Troncon in a Six Nations match, the hotel cleaning ladies in Rome hugged him. And if someone needed to be bumped into economy class for a flight, no prizes for guessing who fingers pointed to…Stringer recently published a fascinating autobiography. The tale of how he was mistaken for a mascot by parents, when leading out the Pres U13 team that he captained, opens one of the most brilliant and heart-rending chapters you could ever read.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS To buy Peter Stringer’s book Pulling the Strings, published by Penguin Ireland, click here.Special delivery: His work ethic made him one of the best passers of a ball in the pro era (Inpho)last_img read more

Canada: Dialogue renewed with the United Church

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Tags Rector Collierville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT [Anglican Journal] The Anglican Church of Canada has entered a new round of dialogue with the United Church of Canada. The aim is to explore ways in which the two churches can work together for more effective ministry and mission.“Much of the impetus for these conversations is coming from the grassroots of our two churches,” says Archdeacon Bruce Myers, the Anglican church’s coordinator for ecumenical relations. “Many communities across Canada are served by ecumenical shared ministries in which Anglicans and United church people and clergy work and worship side by side. They’re asking our churches’ leadership to find ways to facilitate such cooperation in mission and ministry.”To that end, 12 new representatives from the two denominations met in Toronto May 14-17 at St. John’s Convent, the headquarters of the Sisters of St. John the Divine. In addition to theological conversation, the group shared common prayer, meals and fellowship.At the request of the 2010 General Synod of the Anglican Church of Canada, and with the agreement of the United Church’s Theology and Inter-Church Inter-Faith Committee, this latest series of talks is focusing on “the doctrinal identities of the two churches and the implications of this for the lives of the churches—including understandings of sacraments and orders of ministry.”The current phase builds on six years of formal conversations, which concluded in 2009. The results of these discussions were reported in Drawing from the Same Well: The St. Brigid Report.“The first meeting of this new round was very encouraging,” says Myers. “Both churches have appointed outstanding individuals who are both steeped in their own church’s tradition and also open to real dialogue. During that first gathering, I think we were reminded that despite our differences, there is still so much more that we have in common as churches and as followers of Christ, and that the things that unite us are far greater in number and importance than those things that divide us.”That said, the two denominations must address and try to reconcile existing differences. “What the end result of that will be, only God knows,” says Myers. “At this point, the dialogue is being deliberately ambivalent about setting any kind concrete goals or objectives for these conversations. We want to be open to the Holy Spirit’s leading about what unity between us might look like.”Myers is hopeful that models for a closer relationship between the two churches will emerge from these discussions. The two organizations are already partners in a number of multilateral ecumenical initiatives, especially in the area of social justice. In Edmonton, for example, they worked together to establish the ecumenical Inner City Pastoral Ministry.But what about lingering memories of the failure of the 1975 Plan of Union to merge the two churches into one: is it hovering over these new dialogues? “I think the failure of the plan to organically unite the Anglican and United churches in Canada was felt more acutely in the first round of this dialogue in 2003, which was the first time since the plan failed in 1975 that our two churches had engaged in a formal conversation,” says Myers. “There were feelings of disappointment, grief and frustration that needed to be acknowledged and expressed, especially on the United church side.”The United church was understandably aggrieved when the Anglican church abruptly ended the union negotiations and soon initiated conversations with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in Canada. “For some in the United church, it seemed as if we Anglicans had danced with them, then left them at the altar and began dancing with somebody else,” Myers concedes.Venting and validating those feelings was a necessary step before the Anglican-United dialogue could move forward. “That was a part of the 2003 to 2009 round. This new round acknowledges our failed merger of 1975, but the failure doesn’t loom on everyone’s shoulders like some kind of black raven,” he says. “Both of our churches have changed since 1975—and so has the context in which we exist as churches—and it’s against that new backdrop that these conversations are taking place.”Still, there are stumbling blocks and sticking points aplenty. Although both are sacramental churches engaging in diaconal, presbyteral and episcopal ministries, there are differences in the ways in they celebrate the sacraments, select, train and order sacramental ministers, and exercise the ministry of oversight.“The reality of our present situation is that there is no real mutual recognition of ministries between our two churches,” notes Myers. “An Anglican priest who moves to the United church is not ordained again; she or he is received as a validly ordered minister of word and sacrament. However, the reverse is not the case.”This new series of talks will focus on the related topics of sacraments and ministry. The representatives will resume the dialogue in January 2013 in Vancouver, focusing on how each church’s doctrine, worship and life are informed by credal statementsTeam members shown above, left to right, include: the Rev. Elisabeth Jones, the Rev. Dr. Gordon Jensen, the Rev. Dr. Andrew O’Neill, the Rev. Stephen Silverthorne, the Rev. Dr. Sandra Beardsall, the Rev. William Harrison, Dr. Gail Allen, the Ven. Bruce Myers, the Ven. Dr. Lynne McNaughton, the Rev. Donald Koots. Missing: Ms. Lorraine Kakegamic and the Rev. Dr. Paula Sampson.— Diana Swift is staff writer for the Anglican Journal. Rector Smithfield, NC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Canada: Dialogue renewed with the United Church Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing By Diana SwiftPosted May 30, 2012 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

‘To help people, to further the kingdom’

first_img Submit an Event Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Featured Events ‘To help people, to further the kingdom’ Congregations engage the complexities of mental illness Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Clifford Williams, working in the Friendship Center’s studio, paints head of a tiger. The Friendship Center is a ministry of Holy Comforter Episcopal Church in Atlanta, where more than half the congregation includes persons living with mental illness. Photo: Ann Fowler/Holy Comforter[Episcopal News Service] When Matthew Collins was diagnosed with bipolar disorder about seven years ago, he lost his job, his marriage and his self-understanding in rapid succession.“Mental illness turned my own mind into something I no longer recognized,” Collins told ENS recently. During two sleepless weeks he cycled through psychosis, paranoia, grandiose illusions, beliefs that people were trying to kill him. Eventually he was hospitalized. Afterwards, there was the stigma of being labeled a person with mental illness.“It was an extremely frightening experience, the most frightening experience I’d ever endured,” he recalled. “I lost the job I was working while I was hospitalized. I was married at the time. My wife then was frightened by the experience in the same way I was frightened, but she did not want to engage it. So, she left.“I had been very successful in my undergraduate degree, working full-time and going to school full-time and had been supporting myself since I turned 18,” Collins said. “I was also in the U.S. Air Force reserves and I had balanced it all very well and very successfully, so it was a very painful experience to move from being an independent, successful person to someone I no longer recognized.”When he told family members about his diagnosis, their reaction was, unfortunately, typical of many, including clergy and communities of faith: “they just kind of acted like it wasn’t there,” he recalled.Mental illness in varying degrees affects some 25 percent of the U.S. population and struggling families often turn first for support and aid to clergy and faith communities, who typically are ill-equipped to offer meaningful assistance.“I think there is an imperative that the Body of Christ actually be the Body of Christ,” said Collins, executive director of the Friendship Center, a ministry of Holy Comforter Episcopal Church in Atlanta, where more than half the congregation includes persons living with mental illness.“My hope for the Body of Christ at large and the Episcopal Church in the future is that we would truly mirror more and more what neighborhood churches look like,” Collins said. “In particular, there are people living with mental illness and/or families of people living with mental illness in every congregation across our nation but in most churches, it’s just unspoken and unaddressed.”Holy Comforter: ‘all of us together’The Rev. Mike Tanner, Holy Comforter’s vicar, believes that acknowledging mental illness is often “too challenging to our self image.”“I know people who have trouble coming to Holy Comforter and I think it’s because the presence of mental illness in other people creates fear in them about themselves,” Tanner told ENS. “We often have an idea of what church ought to be like and it’s pretty nice and clean and well-ordered and doesn’t look like the world around us. But,” he added, “Holy Comforter looks like the world around us.”The Rev. Mike Tanner, Holy Comforter Episcopal Church’s vicar, says the community is “the richest spiritual and theological environment I’ve ever been in.” Photo: Daniel Tanner/Holy ComforterFounded in 1893, Holy Comforter was nearly shuttered in the mid-1980s “because of white flight” out of the city, he said. Those left behind were the poor and former residents of mental institutions released under federally mandated deinstitutionalization. Then, a new vicar walked the neighborhood, inviting everyone to church “and the people who came were living in group homes and had recently been released from mental institutions,” Tanner said.Now, Holy Comforter’s average Sunday attendance is about 80, and about 60 percent of the congregation includes “people who live with a diagnosable mental illness” such as schizophrenia, psychotic disorder, anxiety disorder and depression, and who are severely and persistently affected by mental illness to the extent that they do not have much of a work life at all because of their illness,” Tanner said.“The bulk are people in personal-care homes, whose only income is their SSI (supplemental security income) check and who get Medicaid for their medical services and who basically live in significant poverty, along with mental illness or some other disability.”And yet Holy Comforter “turns out to be the richest spiritual and theological environment I’ve ever been in,” he said.“We have a rich liturgical life, a prayer book-centered liturgy, but the thing that has amazed me is how rich the environment is because of the presence of people who aren’t like I am, … and how visibly God is working in their lives, and how strong their faith is, in spite of their Job-like lives.”Are there disruptions? Sure, Tanner said. “There are odd things, like one woman who’s so severely affected that she will get up in the middle of my preaching or celebrating and walk up to the altar and move something from one side to the other. In many ways, we’ve learned to be more relaxed about that than if we were in a buttoned-up place.”The remainder of the congregation “are people who find this kind of church a very attractive place to be, that worshipping God in the presence of poverty and chronic illness and that kind of vulnerability on the surface all the time, enriches their spiritual lives and also gives them a sense of mission of something they can do in the world to help people, to further the kingdom.”Like Helen Cabe, an independent contractor nurse, who said she went to Holy Comforter about four years ago to donate clothes, “fell in love with the place and the next thing I knew, I was driving vans and serving meals. I joined the church, got baptized and here I am.”“Some really different stuff happens there, but also some very amazing things happen,” said Cabe, 45. With “some mental health issues in my family” she especially likes the services Holy Comforter provides, through its Friendship Center, to the community.“Society just does not provide for people with mental illness,” she said. “The safety net is not effective. A lot of our members live in some pretty rough conditions and aren’t cared for. We advocate for them. We provide services, meals. One of our members who has a mental health disability used to be a nurse and is now employed by the church to do vital signs; and he has a foot clinic.”Moreover, everyone is involved in the church’s liturgical life, she added. “We have people at so many different levels of ability. So, people who are able to read get up and read. One of our choir members lives in a group home and the people who carry the offering plates, and the bread and wine, are profoundly disabled.“We encourage wellness, and for everybody to do as much as they can,” she said. “It makes for more of a sense of community. It’s not us and them; it’s all of us together.”From left, May C. Brown, director of Friendship Center’s gardening program; Eddie Dillard, gardener and Alice Delaney, parishioner, volunteer, and Brown’s partner join a customer to look over a selection of plants at the farmers’ market at the Cathedral of St Philip. Photo: Ann Fowler/Holy ComforterFor Richard Cummins, 47, the gardening program at the Friendship Center has meant a whole new life and community.“It’s hard for me not to worry and stuff,” Cummins told ENS. “I worry about things that a lot of people wouldn’t worry about. My anxiety prevented me from holding a job and I ended up in a personal-care home,” he said.When the Holy Comforter van picked up other residents at the group home a few years ago, he decided to go along, too. Now, he works Tuesdays and Thursdays — and since it’s springtime, on Saturdays, too — in the garden center. “I do just about everything in the garden, transplanting, I’m real good at organizing and cleaning out the tool shed. This year, we’ve planted tomatoes, herbs, parsley, eggplant, just about everything, and flowers. And I weed the garden.”And that’s not all. “I sing in the choir,” Cummins said. “I do bible readings at the Wednesday evening services and I’m on the vestry.”Last year, the center served 16,000 meals, provided arts and other programs to an average 85 people daily. If ever there was a community “that owned mental illness and claimed it for what its redemptive value can be, this is it,” said Collins.‘Friend to Friend’ – learning to engageThrough the diocesan Episcopal Community Services congregations in the Diocese of San Diego can offer support and assistance to homeless people who also suffer from mental illness, according to Lesslie Keller, executive director/chief executive officer.“It’s an old-fashioned, street-based ministry to the chronically ill who also have a diagnosis of mental illness,” Keller told ENS. “I find that usually has a co-occurring substance abuse disorder. We’re dealing with people with schizophrenia, bipolar, anxiety disorder who experience repeated bouts of homelessness or long-term periods of homelessness.”San Diego County has an estimated 9,000 homeless people, mainly in the downtown area, Keller said. Volunteers for the Friend to Friend program invite homeless persons to a drop-in center, where case management services, arts and other classes and meals are available to them. Congregations sponsor the meals, according to Deann Ayer, community engagement coordinator. “It’s a welcoming, inviting place where people can work on their goals and seek healing and significant progress,” Ayer said.On a mission to “dismantle the stigma of mental illness” Keller said that, inevitably, whenever she makes presentations about Friend To Friend, “someone pulls me aside and in a confessional way tells me about a family member suffering from mental illness and in a very moving and concerning way tells me how the family can’t talk about it.”Part of a trend across the churchIncreasingly, faith communities across the nation are acknowledging the need to equip clergy and congregations to assist persons with mental illness.The Rev. Canon Angela Shepherd has helped coordinate a series of Mental Health First Aid workshops in the Diocese of Maryland, as a proactive way of “offering support, and pointing people in the right direction for mental health care,” she wrote in an email to ENS. “The workshop covers suicide, anxiety, depression, and substance abuse. The information is pertinent for clergy and lay alike.”All of which “has really hit home,” for the Rev. Caroline Stewart, associate rector of The Church of the Redeemer, Baltimore, who acknowledged that she, along with parishioners, has family members living with mental illness. But often, “because of the stigma associated with it, they don’t self-identify.”While most persons coping with mental illness are not violent, a clergy colleague and a parish administrator were killed by an individual who was homeless who had mental health issues two years ago at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Ellicott City, Maryland, she said. Since then, “we have had programs deliberately on mental illness, for not only the congregation but for the community. We will do something each year to de-stigmatize the issue of mental illness,” she said.“Anything you can do to bring it into the sunshine of day,” she added. “You never know who you’re going to touch and what impact you’ll have.”Victoria Slocum, a doctoral student at the University of Kentucky, is hoping to develop ways to incorporate persons with intellectual disabilities into worship services because “liturgical churches like the Episcopal Church are ideally suited because we follow a precise format in our services.”Her efforts may also assist congregations in opening themselves up, as well. “I remember being in a church with a woman who had three children with severe ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) who was asked not to come back to the church,” she said.The former special-education teacher also “had parents who said they would like to go to church but didn’t want to take their children for fear they’d disrupt the service.“People in need, need the church most,” she said. “That’s why we need to make our churches truly welcoming and create a situation where they can participate. It’s more than just coming and sitting in church. The question is, if a person wants to worship, how can we include them? Everyone’s got a right to worship as they wish or not, but if they do wish to worship, how can we make it accessible to them?”Holy Comforter Episcopal Church in Atlanta is “a congregation living with significant mental illness,” its vicar says. Photo: Richard Norris/Holy ComforterTanner of Holy Comforter said: “You have to start with the realization that, whether I can see it or not, right now it’s in my parish and if I begin manifesting an openness to talking about mental illness and to people with mental illness, if I stop resisting the stigma of mental illness, I can create an environment within the parish that makes people feel safe to talk about it.”“People don’t talk about things like that in church because church is just like the rest of society in so many cases and the rest of society doesn’t want to know about it.”He added that: “People with mental illness are very aware they’re different and that it’s dangerous to let other people know what they’re going through,” he added.Holy Comforter’s program is not based on a charity model and that is a good thing, according to the Friendship Center’s Collins. “This is a model of mutuality and in that mutuality of personhood and human dignity, no one is providing ministry to the mentally ill.”“We are just a congregation living with significant mental illness,” he said. “And what I’m learning at my time at Holy Comforter is, when you extend ministry with, rather than ministry to, it starts to open up ministry with every group, so inclusion just breeds more inclusion.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service.   Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Belleville, IL Comments (2) Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Angela Shepherd says: Submit a Job Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem center_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Jobs & Calls Becca Allison says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By Pat McCaughanPosted Apr 16, 2014 Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC April 17, 2014 at 1:05 pm This is a great article and it’s nice to know so much is happening throughout the Episcopal Church. Just one correction though. I along with Sharon Tillman, my colleague on staff, have worked to coordinate workshops in the Diocese of Maryland that will be led by qualified professionals from the Mental Health Association of Maryland. I will not be leading them. Sharon and I have attended a workshop and highly recommend it. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Comments are closed. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC May 11, 2014 at 4:17 pm Absolutely wonderful. This is how it should be done. I happen to love several people who have been diagnosed with mental illness as well as having depressive episodes myself. Loving them for who they are and what they can contribute is a wonderful gift. God bless these folks! Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID last_img read more

General Convention passes budget with money for evangelism, racial reconciliation

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH General Convention passes budget with money for evangelism, racial reconciliation Evangelism decision comes as amendment from deputies Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Program Budget & Finance Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Press Release Service In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest General Convention, Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jul 3, 2015 General Convention 2015, Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 [Episcopal News Service – Salt Lake City] The General Convention adopted the 2016-2018 triennial budget July 2 after agreeing to add $2.8 million for evangelism work.While the addition passed with relatively little debate in the House of Deputies, it faced some opposition in the House of Bishops.The 2016-2018 triennial budget is based on $125,083,185 in revenue, compared to the forecasted $118,243,102 for the triennium that ends Dec. 31 of this year. The expenses are projected to be $125,057,351. The budget comes in with a negligible surplus of $25,834. Its revenue projection is based in part on asking the church’s dioceses and regional mission areas to give 18 percent of their income to fund the 2016 budget, 16.5 percent for the 2017 budget and 15 percent in 2018.The version of the budget presented July 1 by the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance (PB&F) also included a major new $2 million initiative on racial justice and reconciliation, even as it reduces the amount of money it asks dioceses to contribute to 15 percent by 2018. The initiative remains.The new money for Latino-Hispanic initiatives and church planting amounts to some but not all of that called for in resolutions A086 and D005 respectively. Together, the two resolutions called for $6.5 million.The budget proposed by PB&F already contained $3 million for starting new congregations. The budget noted that PB&F anticipated a collaborative effort to assist underserved populations, including Hispanic communities.The approved budget will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2016.The Rev. Frank Logue, a Georgia deputy and PB&F member, proposed adding the extra money for evangelism, saying “this convention stands at a potentially historic moment” having elected a “chief evangelism officer” when it elected North Carolina Bishop Michael Curry as its next presiding bishop. He said while both houses had concurred on resolutions A086 and D005, the proposed budget “does not meaningfully add to our evangelism effort.”“But the good news is we have the means to match the will of this body,” he said, proposing the half-percent additional draw on investment income.Doing so, he said, would “allow us to move out of this convention having provided our newly elected presiding bishop with the support he needs to assist us in reaching others for the love of Jesus Christ.”While Logue suggested that the $2.8 million be gained through an added half-percent draw on income from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s approximately $220 million in unrestricted invested assets, his amendment to the budget called for adding the money in a line named “Income from Unrestricted Reserves for Evangelism Initiatives.” The DMFS’ unrestricted invested assets and its short-term reserves are two different pools of money. The $2 million allocation for racial reconciliation and justice work is also due to come from short-term reserves.The Rev. Susan Snook of Arizona, Resolution D005’s sponsor, told the deputies that “it is time for us as The Episcopal Church to put our money where our mouth is, to be bold, daring and passionate in the belief that we have something to offer every community, every culture, every place where we are The Episcopal Church.”“No investment in changing lives is ever, ever wasted,” she said.The deputies voted 571-257 to add the $2.8 million.Deputies also agreed, 455-368, to move $150,000 out of the amount budgeted for the church’s development office and grant it to The Episcopal Network for Stewardship. The $266,530 the group received in the current budget had been viewed as a one-time grant, and PB&F did not renew it.The Rev. John Floberg, deputy from North Dakota and a member of Executive Council and PB&F, then took to a microphone to urge deputies to stop changing the budget.Calling this one of the most open budget processes the church has ever known, Floberg said: “It’s time for this house to allow the budget that was presented and is now amended to remain in place. This is not the time for deputies who haven’t been hearing all of the information about all of the requests that have come through to be pitting one thing up against another. It’s time for some trust.”The budget then passed 799-24.The House of Bishops debated the evangelism provision with most bishops calling for its acceptance.“Sometimes you’ve just got to take the risk,” said Bishop Scott Hayashi, of the hosting diocese of Utah. “We have spoken that evangelism and racial reconciliation are important to us. If we really believe that, we need to find a way to do it.”“To say yes, we’re in favor of evangelism but we’re not going to fund it would make us look pretty foolish,” said Arizona Bishop Kirk Smith, adding, “The mission of the church is not to balance the budget.”Diocese of Los Angeles Bishop Suffragan Diane Bruce told her colleagues “it’s important that we remember we’re talking about God’s economics, not man’s or woman’s economics.”The bishops approved the budget as sent to them by deputies on a voice vote.The impetus for the budget’s racial justice and reconciliation initiative came from Resolution C019 that calls on the church to respond to systemic racial injustice. It asks for $1.2 million for that work.“It was the sense of the (PB&F) committee that given the atmosphere we’re living in now – the shootings and the plight of African-American men – that we wanted to do more,” the Rev. Mally Lloyd of Massachusetts, PB&F chair, told ENS the day before the budget was presented. “Give them $2 million and a blank slate to really try something new for the church that we hope will have major impact.”Lloyd said the committee decided to leave the dimensions of the work “for the movement of the spirit” to guide the church’s leaders.The $2 million will come from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s short-term reserves and is part of the $4.7 million surplus with which the 2013-2015 triennium is predicted to end.“We’re taking a risk as a church that we don’t have an emergency that would call on those reserves,” Diocese of Maine Bishop Stephen Lane, PB&F vice chair, told ENS. “We’re seeing this as an extraordinary circumstance and an extraordinary opportunity and, therefore, using extraordinary means to support it.”The original budget as proposed by PB&F is here. ENS’s coverage of PB&F’s budget presentation is here and includes more detail about what it contains.— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Tracy Sukraw, a member of the ENS General Convention team, contributed to this story. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

Le Magazine Anglican : Émission de juillet

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Featured Events Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Posted Jul 13, 2016 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Bath, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Press Release New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Vous êtes-vous jamais demandé pourquoi tant d’églises anglicanes sont dénommées St Paul ? Y a-t-il un fondement théologique ?Le Magazine Anglican a posé la question à Bill Tompson, responsable de la formation chrétienne à la Cathédrale de la Sainte Trinité à Paris.Original dans sa réponse, Bill Tompson nous invite à redécouvrir les épitres de Saint Paul et peut-être réviser certaines interprétations pourtant bien ancrées.Et c’est précisément sur les traces de St Paul que débute l’itinéraire suivi par le Magazine Anglican, à la découverte d’une trentaine d’églises anglicane dans le monde : du Moyen Orient jusqu’en Océanie, en passant par l’Europe, l’Amérique et l’Afrique.En Europe, deux capitales honorent l’apôtre des « gentils ». Londres avec la Cathédrale St Paul, haut lieu des célébrations royales et Rome où l’église St Paul-dans-les-murs de la Convocation des Églises Épiscopales en Europe a été classée monument historique par l’État italien.Aux Etats-Unis, il y a douze cathédrales dénommées St Paul. Celle d’Oklahoma compte plus d’un millier de paroissiens, mais c’est la petite chapelle St Paul de Manhattan qui est sans doute la plus célèbre. Après les attentats du 11 septembre, elle a servi de base aux 8 000 bénévoles qui sont intervenus sur le site du World Trade Center.À découvrir aussi, l’église lusitophone St Paul au Brésil, les deux églises du Cap, la cathédrale St Paul de l’église anglicane, au nom maori, de Nouvelle Zélande ou encore la Cathédrale St Paul de Melbourne, réputée pour ses sonneurs de cloche, qui utilisent la méthode du « change ringing ».Sans oublier, la petite église anglaise où les paroissiens sont invités à tweeter pendant le sermon.Cliquer sur le lien ci-dessous, puis sur la flèche bleue pour télécharger l’émission du 09/07/2016 ou sur la flèche dans un rond pour l’écouter.Fréquence ProtestanteLe Magazine Anglican est diffusé, le 2e samedi du mois, à l’antenne parisienne de Fréquence Protestante. Via la radio numérique, chaque émission est accessible pendant six mois, aux auditeurs francophones d’Europe, d’Amérique, d’Afrique et d’Océanie.Animé depuis 2012, par Laurence Moachon, paroissienne de la Cathédrale de la Sainte Trinité à Paris, le Magazine Anglican a pour objectif de mieux faire connaître la tradition anglicane / épiscopale. Rector Belleville, IL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Le Magazine Anglican : Émission de juillet Sur le chemin des Églises St Paul, à travers la Communion Anglicane Rector Knoxville, TN Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

Episcopalians take stock of Hurricane Matthew’s damage

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN A utility pole with a no-parking sign sits in a Fayetteville, North Carolina, creek after a lake burst its dam because of a deluge from Hurricane Matthew Oct.10. Photo: REUTERS/Jonathan Drake[Episcopal News Service] Episcopalians along the southeast coastal United States are assessing the damage wrought by Hurricane Matthew.Some still cannot return to their homes because of severe damage in their communities or because rain-swollen rivers and creeks are still flooding.The storm killed more than 1,000 people in Haiti by the estimate of the Reuters news service. Officials there have begun burying people in mass graves.At least 21 have died in the U.S. – nearly half of them in North Carolina, according to the Associated Press. Most were swept away by flood waters and officials worry that the U.S. death toll may rise as impatient people drive around road barricades into swiftly moving floodwaters. Water from the torrential rains that hit eastern North Carolina over the weekend continue to swell rivers and levees and dams are threatened. Some people missing since the storm have been found but others are still missing, the news service saidEpiscopal Relief & Development said Oct. 10 that it continues to provide technical assistance to local partners in the areas affected by Hurricane Matthew, as the storm dissipates over the Atlantic Ocean. In the places most severely impacted, information gathering is hampered by downed communications lines, widespread power outages and damage to critical roads and bridges, the organization said.”“From what we are seeing so far, the damage is extensive in a number of areas and it will take a long time, even years, for many of these places to recover,” said Abagail Nelson, senior vice president for programs.Members of the Diocese of North Carolina on Oct. 10 were still trying to assess damage there, but “as of this afternoon, we don’t have reports of major damage sustained by churches within our diocese,” Director of Communications Christine McTaggart told Episcopal News Service via email. Diocesan officials had not yet heard about major damage to any church.“We’ll continue to stay in touch with churches in the areas hardest hit until rivers have finished rising and the danger of additional flooding has passed,” she wrote.Diocese of East Carolina Bishop Robert Skirving and the Rev. Canon J. M. “Sonny” Browne, canon for diocesan life, worked from home Oct. 10 to check in with parish leadership. The two had learned that Trinity Center, the diocesan camp and conference center at Pine Knoll Shores sustained light wind damage and tree loss; Trinity Episcopal Church in Chocowinity had several inches of water enter its undercroft; and St. John’s Episcopal Church in Fayetteville experienced some flooding.The Fayetteville Observer reported that St. John’s parking lot was submerged Oct. 9, as well as the children’s playground and bottom floor of the church. The choir room, preschool chapel and an administrative office on the bottom floor were among the areas that sustained serious damage, according to member Mary Holmes, who said the church had recently undergone a major restoration in anticipation of its 200th anniversary next year.More than 45 people came to help clean the church out early on Oct. 9, Holmes told the paper. By afternoon, rugs and children’s toys littered the parking lot as volunteers worked to save what they could.Diocesan House in Kinston, North Carolina, was without telephone and internet service. Water entered offices there; it was “fortunately not deep, but enough to wet the carpet thoroughly,” Browne said via email.“Bridges are closing as I write this email, as the rivers are swelling,” Browne reported. “At this hour, we are unaware of catastrophic loss of parish property in our diocese.”Later in the day, Browne emailed to say that East Carolina was experiencing horrible flooding and evacuation.  “The damage to the state’s road infrastructure is astounding with a great many roads washed out in one or more places,” he wrote.Member of the Episcopal Church in South Carolina were also regrouping on Oct. 10 and trying to find out how congregations in the Lowcountry along the coast fared, Holly Behre, director of communications, reported via email.Information posted on the diocese’s Facebook page pointed evacuees to Episcopal churches in the Dioceses of Upper South Carolina, Western North Carolina, North Carolina and Atlanta.Members of four of those coastal congregations had organized Eucharist together the day before near Hendersonville, North Carolina. Most of those attendees were from All Saints Episcopal Church on Hilton Head Island, which was very hard hit. They are still not able to return home, Behre said.The Rev. Richard Carroll Lindsey, All Saints’ rector, wrote on the church’s website that an eyewitness reported that the church weathered the storm with only a street light down, a small tree across the entrance and the cross on the steeple damaged.Trees knocked down in Hurricane Matthew lie outside of the doors of St. Francis of the Islands Episcopal Church in Savannah, Georgia. Photo: Diocese of Georgia via FacebookIn the Diocese of Georgia, six of 24 coastal churches held services on Oct. 9. As evacuees were returning home Oct. 10, Bishop Scott Benhase said that damage on the coast was “less than was feared or forecasted.”However, Benhase said, “we know that others in the southeastern United States, and particularly our sisters and brothers in Haiti, the Dominican Republic and the Bahamas, did not fare so well. Our hearts and prayers go out to them.”He urged people to donate to Episcopal Relief & Development.Twenty-two coastal churches and the retreat center suffered minor damage or even no damage from the storm, Benhase said. St. Francis of the Islands Episcopal Church, Savannah, lost a significant number of trees, which in turn damaged the church porch, education building and playground. No survey of All Saints Episcopal Church on Tybee Island has yet been possible, although some areas near the church experienced flooding and wind damage, the bishop said.“In the days ahead there will be insurance claims to file and lots to repair and to clean up. We will do that and move on,” Benhase predicted. “God has called us together so that we might be the hands and heart of Jesus for others.”Federal Emergency Management Agency officials survey damage on Highway A1A near Daytona Beach, Florida. Photo: FEMADiocese of Southeast Florida Bishop Peter Eaton voiced similar concern for those in the Caribbean after Matthew. “While we in our diocese were not hit by the full force of this storm, others have been terribly hit, and I hope that we can give from our strength and sense of gratitude,” he wrote Oct. 8.In Jacksonville, Florida, St. John’s Cathedral opened its doors during the storm and became a sanctuary for some people, the Very Rev. Kate Moorehead said.The dean predicted in her Oct. 9 sermon that the congregation would not soon forget the hurricane or the anxety of wondering if they would see each other again. She recounted riding out the storm with her husband and sons in one part of their home away from the side shaded by a large water oak tree. They worried that the tree would fall on the house but, instead, it fell into the front yard. “We just have one hole in the roof – a small one,” she said.However, the downed tree trapped the family in the house for two days until they could cut through some limbs with a chainsaw and get her car out of the driveway. Freed, Moorehead and one of her sons drove down the street and almost got hit by an oncoming car in an intersection.“Aren’t you grateful after this storm to be alive?” she asked.Such gratitude, she said, is about “opening our eyes to the truth that God has given us life and, no matter what happens, all we can say is ‘thank you.’ ”People walk along a street in downtown Jeremie, Haiti, Oct. 6, two days after Hurricane Matthew made landfall nearby. While the capital Port-au-Prince was mostly spared from the full strength of the class 4 hurricane, the western cities of Les Cayes and Jeremie received Matthew’s full force. Photo: Logan Abassi UN/MINUSTAHMeanwhile, nearly a week after Hurricane Matthew began its destructive journey, the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said Oct. 10 that nearly $120 million in aid was needed to help the devastated portions of Haiti.Local aid officials struggled to get food, medicine and water to increasingly desperate communities still isolated almost a week after the blow from Hurricane Matthew, the Associated Press reported. Officials said that young men – some of them armed – in villages along the road between the hard-hit cities of Les Cayes and Jeremie were putting up blockades of rocks and broken branches to halt convoys of vehicles bringing relief supplies.Episcopal Relief & Development it will support local partners such as the Bishop Tharp Institute (BTI) in Les Cayes to provide food and water to displaced people sheltering on the school’s campus.“Papa, J’ai peur, je veux du soleil (Daddy, I am scared, I want to see the sun),” Ernest Cajuste’s 4-year-old son told him as the hurricane bore down on their Haitian homeCajuste, an Episcopal Relief & Development program officer, wrote that “the strong winds made it sound like our house might disappear into the air,” about riding out the hurricane in Haiti. “We could hear a high, shrill, piercing clatter when our window frames vibrated. This is the first hurricane he has lived through. That was certainly a scary moment for him, but after the long, dark night of tension, we were fine. We were lucky.”– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Oct 10, 2016 Press Release Service Hurricane Matthew Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Smithfield, NC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 The Rev. D F Lindstrom says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Featured Jobs & Calls October 11, 2016 at 8:31 am “continues to provide technical assistance.” What about direct financial aide though local dioceses as you did not help in Central Gulf Coast after Katrina as my parish in Greenville, Al, and other churches served over 500 displaced persons per day. ERD was a lifesaver because of the financial help. We did not need technical assistance. Rector Collierville, TN Comments (2) October 19, 2016 at 5:49 pm I am a member of St Martin’s in Houston. Tell me how we can help. Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Job Listing Episcopalians take stock of Hurricane Matthew’s damage Danger not over for Carolinians, officials say Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments are closed. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Nancy Chickering says: Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC last_img read more

Jonathan Petre named Archbishop of Canterbury’s head of media

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Posted Nov 10, 2016 Rector Albany, NY Jonathan Petre named Archbishop of Canterbury’s head of media Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector Columbus, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Belleville, IL Archbishop of Canterbury, [Lambeth Palace press release] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has appointed Jonathan Petre as head of media at Lambeth Palace. Petre is currently the religion and education correspondent at the Mail on Sunday newspaper.This is a new role which will oversee day to day contact with the media and provide the archbishop with regular advice and guidance. The archbishop’s communications team at Lambeth, led by Director of Communications Ailsa Anderson, remains a total of three people.Petre started his journalism career at the Catholic Herald and Daily Telegraph, covering politics, education and the Royal Family. He was also news editor at the Sunday Telegraph, managing a team of more than 20 journalists.He has been with the Mail on Sunday for eight years and will take up his new role at the end of January.Welby said: “Jonathan is an experienced and seasoned journalist with a strong background in reporting religious affairs both on the Church of England and the wider Anglican Communion. I am delighted he has chosen to use his obvious skills to serve the Church and we are all looking forward to working with him.”Petre said: “I have covered religion for most of my journalistic life, and I am really looking forward to putting that experience to use in my new role at Lambeth Palace. I will be joining at an important and exciting time for the Church of England and the Anglican Communion, and I am particularly pleased to be working for such a highly respected archbishop. This is a tremendous opportunity for me to help communicate the vital role played by the Church both nationally and globally.” Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Anglican Communion, Rector Washington, DC People Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET last_img read more